Roche Bobois |

1950 A FAMILY HISTORY 

Roche bobois is the story of two families, the Roches and the Chouchans, not predestined to meet. In 1950, Jacques Roche purchased the old Alexandre Dumas theater on rue de Lyon and built two stores. His sons, Philippe and François, joined the company and together established the company's development strategy. They began to distribute the very best contemporary furniture, which was heavily inspired by Bauhaus designers, such as Minvielle, Steiner and Airbourne, and equally inspired by renowned designers such as Pierre Paulin and Marc Berthier. At this time, the Chouchans were selling furniture in Paris on Boulevard Sébastopol at "Au Beau Bois" (which later became Bobois).

VALUES

Each Roche Bobois piece has its own unique personality, combining the talent, boldness and inventiveness of a designer, with your own style and creativity. Whether you prefer a subtle customization or a thorough one, we offer a choice of shapes, colors, leathers, woods and finishes that make each furniture piece unique, exclusive and truly Designed for You.

Roche Bobois furniture is also sustainable, exclusively manufactured in Europe, and respectful of materials and of the environment. We strive to improve every day, always looking for ways to reduce our environmental impact. On this website, you will find a blend of creativity, customization and responsibility: the unique values that define Roche Bobois and our collections.

This is what we do: bring together inspiration, know-how and people. Art and life. To make a piece of furniture means to create an “art de vivre”

1971: HANS HOPFER IMAGINES THE MAH JONG

Painter, sculptor, designer... Hans Hopfer designed sofas that are, for many, the indisputable “signature” of Roche Bobois’ collections. 

In the 1970s, Hopfer’s innovative and informal approach to comfort had a profound infl uence on the way people furnished and arranged their living space. 

In 1971, he created the Mah Jong, a sofa based on the total freedom of function and form. Starting with three basic elements that can be combined or stacked, the Mah Jong allows limitless options of composition. 

It can be an armchair, sofa, lounge chair or bed; a space in which to rest, to play or to lounge. It encourages experimentation and breaks the rules of formal living, reflecting the nonconformist era in which it was born. 

Avant-garde when first created, iconic today, and “dressed” by Missoni Home and Jean Paul Gaultier, this “free form” modular seating is the reference point for fully modular and creative design.

THE MAH JONG AND FASHION HOUSES

To ‘dress’ the Mah Jong modular sofa, Kenzo Takada took inspiration from ancient kimonos used in the Noh Theatre, re-interpreting their patterns and colours to create fine and sophisticated harmonies symbolising the 3 times of the day: Asa (morning), Hiru (midday), Yoru (evening). Missoni Home is Italian fashion at its most elegant and exuberant expression.
Their iconic chevron stripes, refined fabrics, floral and graphic patterns give the Mah Jong a fresh new look. The French fashion designer has placed his creative stamp on the Mah Jong, “dressing” the design in both his iconic striped sailor-style costume and tattooing the poetic and graphic motifs of his Haute Couture fashion. His creativity, elegance and sophistication break the rules of traditional style.