Blue Marine Foundation |

United To Protect The Oceans.

The Blue Marine Foundation (BLUE) is working to solve the crisis in the oceans through providing innovative solutions to overfishing and enabling the creation of marine reserves. Although BLUE is a small NGO, it punches above its weight, having achieved a tremendous amount for the oceans in a short time. In 2014 BLUE won NGO of the Year in the PEA (People Environment Achievement) Awards in recognition that it was ‘getting results where they matter most’.  In 2015 BLUE won four PEA Awards as part of the GB Oceans Coalition including ‘Overall Champion’.

The Crisis.

Over-fishing represents a major food security issue and has devastating consequences for the fragile biodiversity of our planet. Around 90% of global fish stocks are fully or over-exploited and around 90% of large fish are gone. The consequences are far-reaching, not only for the future of food for a growing global population, but because healthy oceans absorb half the CO2 we produce.

Our Mission.

The Blue Marine Foundation exists to combat over-fishing and the destruction of biodiversity – arguably the largest problem facing the world’s oceans – by delivering practical conservation solutions, including the creation of large-scale marine reserves.

BLUE’s aim is to put 10% of the world’s oceans under protection by 2020 and 30% by 2030. We also work to establish sustainable fisheries so fish stocks can begin to recover

History.

The Blue Marine Foundation (BLUE) is a UK-based charity, established in 2010 by the team behind the film The End of the Line, which brought the world’s attention to the crisis of over-fishing. BLUE was set up to enable the creation of marine reserves and establish models of sustainable fishing. In its five-year existence, BLUE has already achieved a huge amount of impactful ocean conservation, including catalysing the creation of the world’s largest fully protected marine reserve in Chagos in 2010, helping to persuade the government to create an even bigger reserve around Pitcairn in the Pacific in 2015 and facilitating the closure of 52.6% of Ascension’s waters to fishing from January 2016 to the foreseeable future