Ayres | Bespoke Tailor

Traditional Tailor’s Family.

Ayres Gonçalo was born and raised in a traditional tailor’s family and soon showed interest in this art. His grandfather, Ayres Carneiro da Silva owner of the Ayres Alta Costura business, was considered one of the best Portuguese tailors; His career spanned seventy illustrious years where he tailored suits and other articles to a distinguished clientele, including artists, sports people, members of Parliament and bankers. Throughout his youth Ayres demonstrated an increasing interest for fabrics, needles and scissors. At the age of sixteen he had already fallen in love with the art of tailoring and was fortunate to be afforded the opportunity to work after school hours in Grandfather’s shop. He soon became heavily involved in the business by accompanying his Grandfather on client visits giving him his first real exposure to fabrics and fitting. By the time he was nineteen tailoring took up most of his day as this became a full time occupation working under the guidance of his mentor.

International Adventure.

In 2004, Ayres made the decision that in order to broaden his skill set he was to embark on an international adventure to Madrid. It was there at the Sociedad de Sastres de España (Madrid), that Ayres was given the opportunity to improve his knowledge and tailoring techniques. Whilst maintaining a full time job with a well known Spanish tailor ( Pedro Muñoz of N. 72 on Calle Serrano) the Sociedade de Sastres de España awarded Ayres the Cortador de Sasteria certificate in June 2005. Mid 2006 Ayres was to continue his international venture when he opted to relocate to London with a view of fulfilling a childhood dream of working on the ‘Golden Mile of Tailoring’. This street more commonly known as Savile Row is home to the most well known names in the world of traditional bespoke tailoring. After overcoming the initial nervousness of finding a role in this new country, Ayres was offered a position with the renowned Gieves & Hawkes located in No. 1 Savile Row. Here he was given the opportunity to make suits and other articles from scratch whilst learning the high standards required to obtain a ‘Savile Row’ designation. The highlight of his career whilst working for Gieves & Hawkes was undoubtedly when Ayres was requested to make a suit specifically for HRH The Prince of Wales.

At Gieves & Hawkes.

In 2009 whilst still working at Gieves & Hawkes, Ayres was a finalist in Golden Shears Contest, a contest designed to acknowledge young up and coming tailors working in the United Kingdom. In 2010 he received the Bespoke Tailor certificate from the Savile Row Bespoke Association, a seal of approval providing him with worldwide recognition as a tailor who is part of an elite group of bespoke tailors on what can be best considered the Mecca for men seeking the very best of tailoring - Savile Row. It was late 2010 when Ayres decided to gain further international experience out of the EU region. His first stop was New York City, where he worked with a renowned, up and coming tailor - Michael Andrews Bespoke. This six month partnership allowed him to reinforce his experience through contact with the New Yorkers tailor craftsmanship which then led him to China, where he worked for several months training tailors in Shenzhen and Hong Kong. With well over a decade of experience, Ayres Gonçalo understands that this is an opportunity to continue with the Ayres family tradition and establish the Ayres Bespoke Tailor brand. Currently based in Portugal operating between Lisbon and London Ayres will dedicate his time exclusively to his Portuguese and international clients, who have been following him over these past years whilst he has sought to learn, adapt and mature as a tailor. Ayres will utilize this wealth of international experience to continue to provide his exclusive tailoring services to his prized clientele.



FRATELLI PIACENZA S.P.A.

COMPANY

The right balance between innovation and tradition, harmony with the environment and recognition of the value of human beings has made the Fratelli Piacenza wool mills an example of the excellence of Made in Italy at international level.
From top-quality fleeces to fabrics destined to be applied in haute couture or transformed into an article of clothing to wear, every single phase of the transformation is carried out with the greatest sensitivity. Our raw materials first have to face a long, adventurous journey: once they have arrived in the wool mill, they could tell many a story about their places of origin, but their real story is still waiting to be written. After undergoing the process of textile transformation and quality control at every stage in the proceedings, their original noble quality is intensified in fabrics of exceptional value.

TRADITION AND INNOVATION

the feeling is an attitude. Paying attention to listening to human diversity, embracing it to discover that every individual is an added value who contributes to the firm’s human and productive growth. The glue that holds tradition and innovation together is sensitivity. It guides the way towards new discoveries, enabling potential to be discerned and embraced to design the future. Piacenza and nature live in a vital symbiosis that goes further than a mere contemplation of nature’s beauty. It’s a sense of belonging, of experiencing nature actively and accepting its challenges. This is intimately related to fine-tuning the sensory capacities that come into play throughout the production process, to achieve fabrics that are sensitively touching.

Exclusivity and luxury: our cup of tea since 1733

Piacenza Cashmere is delighted to present at the 27th edition of Milano Unica between 10-12th July, the new 2019/2020 FW collection.

Traditional and innovative fabrics will be presented to satisfy everyone’s style but also to let you inspire for your newest creation.

From sustainable and traceable wool in several patterns and colors to a contemporary Mouliné improved by high twist & united melange yarns for your bespoke suits.

Three-dimensionality is a brand new characteristic for dedicated jackets’ fabrics: the finest brushed cashmere from the Alashan region together with other noble fibers will give you back a scratched effect blazer where tradition and innovation find their balance.

Finally, to keep you even warmer during for the cold season, our double-faced fabrics have been developed for an informal, casual look for your daily routine. Do you want to make it more business style?

Let you inspire by our full collection and find your perfect fit at our stand!

We’ll invite you to book an appointment or pop by our booth EO6, Pavillon 20.

Hadleighs | Atelier.

Hadleigh’s Is Haute Stuff.

There are plans for a storefront, but for now Hadleigh’s remains hidden in the Kessler Park neighborhood of Oak Cliff. You will need an appointment. At the door, you will be greeted by the charming Adnan “Ed” Shaikh or perhaps by his adorable wife, Gable. If you prefer, they can come to you, but then you’d miss meeting their 2-year-old daughter, the eponymous Hadleigh herself, who has the run of the place. A glass of wine? A panino? There is no rush. The Shaikhs will want to get to know you before the measuring begins. They met while working at the Ralph Lauren store in Highland Park Village. She had just moved from New York, where she graduated from the Fashion Institute of Technology. He was the third-ranked Ralph Lauren salesman in the country. They were friends at first, then more than that. Ed went on to become a buyer at Stanley Korshak, and Gable followed. By then they were engaged. Last winter, they decided to open their own atelier, Hadleigh’s, selling bespoke clothes for men and women—everything cut and sewn by hand in Italy, made to fit you and only you. You will need to take your wallet. A Hadleigh’s custom suit starts at $1,700; one by Cesare Attolini could cost five times that. To finish the look, Hadleigh’s carries Mazzarelli dress shirts ($600) and bench-made shoes from Barker Black (wing tips, $750). There are lines such as Emanuele Maffeis for women who are similarly unconcerned by price points. Ed says most of his very private customers buy by the dozen. If that sounds like you, make an appointment by visiting

THE BEST MAN CAVE IN TEXAS

These days, a house is not a home without a man cave, but the one Texas men are rating the best in town is the Atelier at Hadleigh’s in Highland Park Village. It’s more than just a place to go for interesting conversation and a new insight into what it takes to be among the best-dressed men in town. It’s a private little world presided over by Ed Shaikh, who is not only a co-founder of Hadleigh’s, but its Creative Director, a guy who understands the world of men’s fashion and knows how to adapt it to every client’s individuality.

You can experience his approach to your own potential by making an appointment to enter this special world. Whether for a fitting or for a consultation, Hadleigh’s-By-Appointment guarantees you’ll have Ed’s undivided attention and plenty of time to explore suiting prototypes, run your hands over luxurious Italian fabrics and explore a unique collection of shirtings and accessories. It’s all waiting for you up on the second floor under the Highland Park Village clock tower.

Ed and his team are committed to giving you the very best— from the finest fabrics to the latest in design. By combining the best components, down to the buttons and the lapel style, end result is a suit, a tuxedo or a sports jacket that is completely different from any other because it has been created just for you. The careful measurements are taken by Ed himself, which he double-checks in a second fitting before returning the garment for finishing. It is an exhausting process, but you’ll be surprised how little time it takes from your first visit to the Atelier to the first compliment about your outstanding good taste.

VITALE BARBERIS CANONICo.

Our History.

The “quinternetto delle taglie” (literally a “small, five-page list of sizes”) dates to 1663, and amounts to a particularly significant historical document for the Barberis Canonico family. It describes Ajmo Barbero’s sale of a “saia grisa” to the Duke of Savoia, and is essentially the first official document testifying to the company’s wool mill activities. But that’s not all: the document also describes a mastery of the dyeing process (something not everyone possessed) that was jealously guarded and passed down from father to son.Halfway through the nineteenth century, Giuseppe Barberis Canonico, following the transformation introduced by the industrial revolution, decided to increase production, collaborating with the Maurizio Sella company, which had already automated its production processes. Later on his son, also named Giuseppe, aimed to increase the number of machines the company was using and rented out a wool mill in Flecchia. By the end of the 1800s, the company was using no fewer than 800 spindles and 73 frames. When the first mechanical frames arrived in 1868, all weaving, dyeing, brushing and threading activities were concentrated in the Pratrivero factory.

GENTLEMAN'S WARDROBE.

Selected with care, enriched over time, the elements that make up a well-constructed men’s wardrobe allow a gentleman to express his sense of style in any situation. First of all, it’s important to identify what’s truly useful, then choose from amongst those the item’s most correct versions, selecting the one that best reflects your individual taste. A wardrobe should comprehend all the major traditional aesthetic areas: seasonality (winter and summer), context (formal, informal, casual), and type of commitment (daytime, evening, ceremonial). Respecting these guidelines means honoring the concentration of clear values and hidden codes that respond to one, single, universal name: tradition.

GARY COOPER | Enduring Elegance.

In his long career as a film actor, Gary Cooper played every type of role available to a leading man” he was a small-town poet and small-town sheriff, a playboy, an heroic soldier, scientist, spy, professor, French Foreign Legionnaire, swashbuckler, con man, fighter pilot, Indian fighter, Bengal lancer, and of course dozens of cowboys. No matter what costume he put on, he looked like he owned it. The camera loved him, and so did the box office.

But costume is one thing, and clothes are another. In his private life he wore contemporary clothes with a perfection of his own debonair style that combined the fine tailored European wardrobe with all-American casual clothes to produce the first and still finest example of elegant international masculinity.

None other than the great American designer Bill Blass once said that Cooper had the greatest sense of style of anyone he’d ever met. It was the purposeful nonchalance of being able to wear clothes effortlessly, to be entirely at easer even in the most formalwear, that defined Cooper’s approach.

“You see,” Blass wrote, “It was no accident that Cooper looked as terrific as he did … he used to go on these shopping expeditions to Rome and Paris. He’d buy cottons by the yard in Mexico and then send them to his shirtmaker in Italy. He had tailors all over the world, and he was the first to buy jeans and do the stone-washing thing. He’d beat them on a rock and leave them out in the sun all day. Did it himself too.”

This approach of artful nonchalance can be seen hundreds of times in Cooper’s films when he’s wearing modern dress: the jaunty angle of his fedora, the colorful silk scarf at the neck or worn as a belt, the tie allowed to float freely around the upturned points of his shirt collar, the fancy patterned sports jacket worn with a knitted sports shirt, a camel hair polo coat thrown loosely over the shoulders, the lapel of his chalk-striped double-breasted suit casually falling to the lower button.

In all of this he rose above and ignored the contrived glamour and studied posturing that had characterised so many film heroes of those years. And he remains, in his ability to personalise tradition, a model for today.